Washington DC history and culture

Washington DC history and culture

On meetups and on eventbrite, there are two groups, Washington DC history and culture, and Baltimore history and culture. They give lectures via Zoom on various historical events and people. They record some of them, but are unable to record the ones that involve music, due to copywrite laws. You’ll have to catch those lectures live. They are well worth it.

Today’s lecture was on Dr. Martin Luthor King, Jr and his speech at the March on Washington for jobs and freedom in 1963. It was recorded and will be posted on YouTube later this week.

They have various lectures already recorded and posted, so you can just search for the groups on YouTube, or you can use the link I posted above.

Again, I stress that these lectures are well worth the time it takes to view them. Be careful, though. You might learn something.

What to do on a day off?

I had very little planned for today, since I normally would be in Las Vegas for the MLK holiday weekend. I decided to use the time off to prep for school which starts next week. I managed to clear off the area where I do school in the garage. It had gotten buried when we had to move stuff around to get the new washing machine in when the old one broke.

I have a lot to do still, since I learned that our storage unit had been broken into at some point, and I need to get the police out with the locksmith and the property manager before I can find out what has been taken. I have no idea how long ago the break in happened, since the storage place no longer has security, and they didn’t inform me.

Anyhow, since I can’t deal with the unit until Wednesday at the earliest, I am attempting to get my reading done. I have 3 books that are almost finished. I think I can finish at least 2 of them.

I also plan to pre blog several posts so they will go out on time. I have already made a list of my school books and bookclub books that I’ll have to read between now and March. Let’s see how far I can get!

I also joined two games on Goodreads to help me move along on my reading challenge. At least a book a week. Very doable for me.

I requested books from the library and put bookmarks into my school books. I have a stack of stuff, including library books, to go into my car to start next week’s projects.

I still have to find a way to honor MLK on the holiday in his honor.

I’m mostly planned out, but we’ll see!

Ten movies to watch on MLK day

Ten movies to watch on MLK day

Here is the list of movies that is mentioned in the above linked article. I’ve seen some of them and have had wonderful things to say about them. They will also go for next month’s black history month. I’m going to try to catch up on those that are on the list that I haven’t read yet.

10 Movies To Watch On Martin Luther King Jr. Day

Selma

All The Way

Boycott

The Rosa Parks Story

Get on the Bus

Malcolm X

For Us The Living: The Medgar Evers Story

Harriet

The Butler

Remember The Titans

MLK quotes we should all know

MLK quotes

I realize that MLK day has passed, but it’s still black history month, and Dr. King’s words are always relevant.

On education:

“The function of education is to teach one to think intensively and to think critically. Intelligence plus character – that is the goal of true education.”

On standing up for what’s right:

“The ultimate measure of a man is not where he stands in moments of comfort and convenience, but where he stands at times of challenge and controversy.”

On community:

“Whatever affects one directly, affects all indirectly. I can never be what I ought to be until you are what you ought to be. This is the interrelated structure of reality.”

On good people staying silent:

“History will have to record the greatest tragedy of this period of social transition was not the strident clamor of the bad people, but the appalling silence of the good people.”

On helping others:

Yutong Yuan/Business Insider

“Life’s most persistent and urgent question, ‘What are you doing for others?'”

On bitterness:

“Never succumb to the temptation of bitterness.”

On speaking up:

“Our lives begin to end the day we become silent about things that matter.”

On justice:

“The moral arc of the universe bends at the elbow of justice.”Ad

On war:

“The past is prophetic in that it asserts loudly that wars are poor chisels for carving out peaceful tomorrows.”

On violence:

“Nonviolence is a powerful and just weapon. Indeed it is a weapon unique in history, which cuts without wounding and enables the man who wields it.”Ad

On staying neutral:

“The hottest place in hell is reserved for those who remain neutral in times of great moral conflict.”

On understanding each other:

“Shallow understanding from people of good will is more frustrating than absolute misunderstanding from people of ill will.”