Amanda Rosenberg presents That’s Mental: Painfully Funny Things That Drive Me Crazy About Being Mentally Ill with Casey Childers

I decided to go to this book signing last week. It sounded interesting, so I preordered the book, so I wouldn’t back out.

I had had a long day at work, so I took myself to dinner at Parada 22, which is a Puerto Rican restaurant, with delicious food. I had a glass of wine and read a bit.

Chicharrones de Pollo with yellow rice, red beans, salad and tostones. Yum.

It was still early when I left the restaurant, so my book and I wandered over to the Alembic, next door to the bookstore. This is a brown butter old fashioned. It was better than I thought it would be. Delicious.

Amanda Rosenberg came out and announced that she hated doing these events and even though she looked calm, she was a wreck. Instant sympathy from me.

Casey Childers came and announced that he never leaves the house, so they were not paired up well for this event. They actually worked beautifully together.

After the Q&A portion, there was a book signing. I got in line and found that the author was chit chatting with everyone. My anxiety kicked in. I didn’t have anything to talk about. I got distracted by the fact that I had had a seat reserved in the front row, because I had preordered the book. No one told me I had a seat saved. I was glad I didn’t know, because it was in the front row. I picked up the note with my name on it and stuck it to the paper I already had stuck in the book.

I started thinking about how anxious I would have been in the front row, so I was distracted when it was my turn for my book to be signed. I said hello and thanked the author for coming. She thanked me and told me she was surprised there were so many people there and it made her nervous. She saw my note from my seat and asked if that was my name. Yes, it was! I didn’t have to spell it for her or anything.

On my way out, I bumped into her husband and he thanked me for coming, and then the other author thanked me for coming. I didn’t sneak out undetected.

I am glad I went and I’m looking forward to reading the book soon. It’s in the book stack at the moment.

Author panel 11/13/19

November is National Novel Writing Month. NaNoWriMo, apparently. Apparently, I can’t read, since I went to the wrong room first, even though its correct location was clearly marked.

The library hosted a panel of writers talking about writing process and what it takes to write 50,000 words a month.

The three authors talked about their various writing techniques, and, while each was different, they have all learned the same thing. Each book needs a different technique.

It was a wonderful presentation, but I had to leave before the end. The part that I saw had a lot of valuable information.

There’s more information on NaNoWriMo.org, but I haven’t checked it out yet.

Inland by Téa Obreht

historical fiction

List of Lists

Inland

Inland by Téa Obreht
My rating: 4 of 5 stars


I spent a lot of this book confused about how the two stories were linked. It didn’t become truly clear until the last two chapters, but I suspected part of it. I did enjoy the story, but Nora’s part was more clear. I was a little fuzzy most of the story about the rest of it.


It was definitely worth reading, but definitely wasn’t what I was expecting.


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Furious Hours, by Casey Cep

This was on the List of Lists from summer 2019.


Furious Hours: Murder, Fraud, and the Last Trial of Harper Lee
 by Casey Cep

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

I didn’t think I was going to enjoy this book as much as I did. I hadn’t read much about Harper Lee before, and the book shed some light onto who she was. The trial she was researching was very interesting, too.

The book flowed well, and the author didn’t try to bounce back and forth between time periods and characters, so it made it easier to follow. It was well-written, and I would definitely recommend it to those who like non-fiction

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Furious Hours: Murder, Fraud, and the Last Trial of Harper Lee