A third of the bed

Molly has figured out that she’s allowed in my room. The cats tell her otherwise, but she’s finally learned to ignore them sometimes.

Sometimes, she decides that she will be sleeping in my room, which is fine. She’s not that big and only takes up a third of the bed at the most.

Unfortunately, most of the time the third of the bed she chooses is the bottom third. I’m not very tall, but this does make it difficult to find a spot for my feet and legs.

It’s still a work in progress, but we’re getting there.

Losing the car

I had an unexpected day off, so I decided to be productive about it. Molly and I had a long list to do.

We started by taking her mom to work in her mom’s car. Molly alerted us by whining whenever a dog was visible. Then I had to go to the ATM. She cried a little when I got out, but stopped soon.

I came back and there was a car that looked like mine near my daughter’s. I knew I didn’t have my car, so I walked past the little red one to a Toyota SUV. My daughter doesn’t have a Toyota. I couldn’t find her car, so I honked the door lock a few times. Couldn’t find it. Then I see miss Molly looking at me from four cars away wondering what the heck I was doing and why I didn’t get in the car.

It’s one thing to do stupid things like that, but another to have a witness. At least Molly won’t tell on me.

Adding activity to my week

I recently started going to meetings for discussions about health and activity. Today’s question was “how will you add activity into your week?” I added that I plan on adding a quick walk a few times a week, since I found it only takes 10 minutes to get around the block with Molly. Less if I go alone, since I don’t stop to smell the bushes. The coach laughed and asked why I didn’t. You know, I didn’t have a good answer.

Doggie laundry lessons

Because Molly and I spend so much time in the garage, I decided that it was time to teach her to help out with the laundry. She watches me each time I put clothes in the washer or dryer, so she knows what to do. I decided that she can help.

She can’t really reach the washing machine well enough to put clothes in. I don’t want her to accidentally eat a laundry soap pod, so they are out of her reach, too. She doesn’t wash her paws frequently enough to allow for me to let her try to put the clean, wet clothes into the dryer. We don’t need mud on the clean clothing. She is lousy at cleaning the lint trap in the dryer. The extra lint and dust make her sneeze, and it sticks to her wet nose. The only option left was to give her the job of folding. I decided to start with towels. She informed me that opposable thumbs were required for this task. Darn it.

I ended up giving her the most important job of all – listening for the alert. She knows that I will get up and go to the washer or dryer when I hear it chime. She leads me to the machines and watches intently as I move the clothes around.

My daughter told me that I succeeded, though. I couldn’t teach Molly how to do laundry, but she learned when to do laundry. Baby steps.

Bobbing for Apples in the Garage

Molly hangs out with me in the garage while I do my homework, school meetings and other Zoom meetings. She is generally quiet, but once in a while, she wants to play. She gets bored.

She got a new ball recently. It would light up with a bump, so when we threw it, it would flash when it bounced. This lasted about a minute. Molly chewed it until the light stopped lighting up. It still works as a fetching toy, though.

On one recent toss, Molly’s ball landed in her water bowl. She looked at me. I wasn’t getting it. It was wet. She wasn’t getting it. It was wet. She tried to get it, but she couldn’t get it without getting herself and the floor wet. It looked like the puppy version of bobbing for apples.

Finally, she got it! She was kind enough to bring it to me. I absentmindedly grabbed it from her. The ball released the rest of the water that was inside it. So, now I was wet, too. I threw it and the final bits of water flew out. So much for keeping the floor dry.

Changing of the guard

My pets love to help with homework. Molly helps keep me warm by squeezing in behind me and putting her head on the arm rest.

Inky helps by sitting on my lap, or my laptop, or watching from the side.

This particular day, I finished working on homework with Molly and I went inside to shower and change and then to continue. After I got settled, Inky settled in, waiting for second homework time to start.

They are very serious about their homework supervising jobs. They keep me warm and usually keep me company while being quiet-ish.

More homework help

A very sleepy Molly decided to help me with homework. She climbs onto the back of the chair and lies down behind me with her head on the armrest. Thankfully, it’s a little chilly right now, so her heat doesn’t bother me much.

Here’s what Molly looks like wide awake

Molly plays hard, makes a mess, and then lies down at my feet in the mess she made. She loves to tear apart cardboard boxes and leave the pieces everywhere.

She usually is a good homework helper. She has a few issues if the film that I am watching has a dog in it. Yesterday, she decided to find a very noisy toy to play with during my Zoom meeting. No one could hear anything, but we got through it.

Sniffing the cactus

Molly is very predictable. She loves breaking down cardboard boxes. She loves chasing the reflection from the glass on watches. She fetches potatoes. She will only pee in large patches of dirt, like the backyard. She won’t pee or poop while she’s on the leash. She cries when she sees other dogs. She will sniff anything that she can. She is infatuated with succulents and cacti. She’s afraid of cats. She’ll stick her head in any paper bag, just to see if the compost is available to sample from.

She’s not an angel, but we know what she will do. I forget a lot that not everyone realizes this.

I took her for a walk today, after running her around to burn off some energy. We walked down the street and she started sniffing all the lawns and plants all the way down the street. We almost reached the corner and she spotted a cactus. I thought, great. We’ll be here a while as she started her full investigation of the cactus. I looked up and saw my neighbor watching us.

He looked at me and snapped “I don’t want your dog peeing there.” I explained that she just likes smelling everything and she already peed before we left the house. He rudely said “well, I have a seven year old to protect, so she’d better not.”

I just walked away with Molly. I started thinking. What exactly is he protecting his kid from? Dog pee? I suppose that he could catch leptospirosis, but she’d have to have been infected, and she did get a vaccination for it because she played in a river a while ago. These infections are pretty rare in humans, anyhow. Doesn’t the neighbor have bigger problems if his kid is playing with a cactus?

I decided to let it go. I know my dog and it’s really none of his business if my dog stops to smell the roses. Or cactus in this case.

How to Name Your Pet

Over the last few weeks, I have noticed more dogs out and about with their owners. I guess the owners are getting out more, so the pets get out more.

I was walking out of work and I could hear a woman dropping her car off with the valet. I heard, “come on Nama. Be good. Nama, stay. Nama stay.” I just knew that she named that dog just so she could say Namaste.

A few days later, as I was going in to work, I saw a woman trying to get out of the car while her dog yapped away inside. “Come on, Loretta. Calm down.” I don’t think I’ve ever met a dog named Loretta before.

Kallie lives in the house which has a backyard that shares a fence with us. When we let our dogs out, it sounds like a tea party is going to happen. “Molly, Doris, Kallie! Keep it down out there!” They mostly just bark to talk, not out of anger. We don’t trust them enough to meet each other face to face.

I love to hear entertaining pet names. If you’ve heard any, please share.