Why You Shouldn’t Censor Your Teen’s Reading

Why you shouldn’t censor your teen’s reading

The above linked article goes along with my previous post about book bans and the newly proposed law that would imprison librarians for allowing children to read “inappropriate” books.

The article above talks about not censoring what your child is reading, but if the book is controversial, or if you feel your child can’t handle the topic, read along with your child and allow them to ask questions and discuss the parts of the book that are uncomfortable.

Also, it talks about the books that parents tend to find are “inappropriate.” These books are usually things that the parents don’t feel comfortable discussing at all, let alone with their child. This is understandable, but the parent/child line of communications should be open, or the child will learn to be uncomfortable about the same topics as the parent.

Attempted Banned books

attempted banned books 2018

The above linked article talks about which books were almost banned and why.  Another list for me to work through.

  1. George by Alex Gino Reasons: banned, challenged, and relocated because it was believed to encourage children to clear browser history and change their bodies using hormones, and for mentioning “dirty magazines,” describing male anatomy, “creating confusion,” and including a transgender character
  2. A Day in the Life of Marlon Bundo by Jill Twiss, illustrated by EG Keller Reasons: banned and challenged for including LGBTQIA+ content, and for political and religious viewpoints
  3. Captain Underpants series written and illustrated by Dav Pilkey Reasons: series was challenged because it was perceived as encouraging disruptive behavior, while Captain Underpants and the Sensational Saga of Sir Stinks-A-Lot was challenged for including a same-sex couple
  4. The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas Reasons: banned and challenged because it was deemed “anti-cop,” and for profanity, drug use, and sexual references
  5. Drama written and illustrated by Raina Telgemeier Reasons: banned and challenged for including LGBTQIA+ characters and themes
  6. Thirteen Reasons Why by Jay Asher Reasons: banned, challenged, and restricted for addressing teen suicide
  7. This One Summer by Mariko Tamaki, illustrated by Jillian Tamaki Reasons: banned and challenged for profanity, sexual references, and certain illustrations
  8. Skippyjon Jones series written and illustrated by Judy Schachner Reason: challenged for depicting stereotypes of Mexican culture
  9. The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian by Sherman Alexie Reasons: banned and challenged for sexual references, profanity, violence, gambling, and underage drinking, and for its religious viewpoint
  10. This Day in June by Gayle E. Pitman, illustrated by Kristyna Litten Reason: challenged and burned for including LGBTQIA+ content
  11. Two Boys Kissing by David Levithan Reason: challenged and burned for including LGBTQIA+ content

Banned books

Here’s another list for me to work my way through. I’ve read a few of them – To Kill a Mockingbird, The Color Purple, The Sun Also Rises, and Lolita. I started a few – Their Eyes Were Watching God, 1984, Catch-22, Animal Farm, and Gone With the Wind.

Hopefully I’ll get through this list one of these days. They all interest me.

The Great Gatsby

The Catcher in the Rye

The Grapes of Wrath

To Kill a Mockingbird

The Color Purple

The Sun Also Rises

As I lay Dying

A Farewell to Arms

Their Eyes Were Watching God

Invisible Man

Song of Solomon

The Lord of the Rings

The Jungle

Lady Chatterley’s Lover

A Clockwork Orange

The Awakening

In Cold Blood

Ulysses

Beloved

Gone with the Wind

The Satanic Verses

The Lord of the Flies

Native Son

Sophie’s Choice

1984

One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest

Sons and Lovers

Lolita

Slaughterhouse-Five

Cat’s Cradle

Of Mice and Men

For Whom the Bell Tolls

A Separate Peace

Catch-22

The Call of the Wild

Naked Lunch

Brave New World

Go Tell It on the Mountain

Brideshead Revisited

Animal Farm

All the King’s Men

Women in Love