2019 Nebula Nominees

2019 nebula nominees

According to the above linked article, the Nebula Awards will take place the last week in May, 2020. The awards honor those who write and produce science fiction and fantasy. Good luck to the nominees!

2019 Nebula Award Finalists

Novel

  • Marque of Caine, Charles E. Gannon (Baen)
  • The Ten Thousand Doors of January, Alix E. Harrow (Redhook; Orbit UK)
  • A Memory Called Empire, Arkady Martine (Tor)
  • Gods of Jade and Shadow, Silvia Moreno-Garcia (Del Rey; Jo Fletcher)
  • Gideon the Ninth, Tamsyn Muir (Tor.com Publishing)
  • A Song for a New Day, Sarah Pinsker (Berkley)

Novella

  • “Anxiety Is the Dizziness of Freedom”, Ted Chiang (Exhalation)
  • The Haunting of Tram Car 015, P. Djèlí Clark (Tor.com Publishing)
  • This Is How You Lose the Time War, Amal El-Mohtar & Max Gladstone (Saga)
  • Her Silhouette, Drawn in Water, Vylar Kaftan (Tor.com Publishing)
  • The Deep, Rivers Solomon, with Daveed Diggs, William Hutson & Jonathan Snipes (Saga)
  • Catfish Lullaby, A.C. Wise (Broken Eye)

Novelette

  • “A Strange Uncertain Light”, G.V. Anderson (F&SF 7-8/19)
  • “For He Can Creep”, Siobhan Carroll (Tor.com 7/10/19)
  • “His Footsteps, Through Darkness and Light”, Mimi Mondal (Tor.com 1/23/19)
  • “The Blur in the Corner of Your Eye”, Sarah Pinsker (Uncanny 7-8/19)
  • Carpe Glitter, Cat Rambo (Meerkat)
  • “The Archronology of Love”, Caroline M. Yoachim (Lightspeed 4/19)

Short Story

  • “Give the Family My Love”, A.T. Greenblatt (Clarkesworld 2/19)
  • “The Dead, In Their Uncontrollable Power”, Karen Osborne (Uncanny 3-4/19)
  • “And Now His Lordship Is Laughing”, Shiv Ramdas (Strange Horizons 9/9/19)
  • “Ten Excerpts from an Annotated Bibliography on the Cannibal Women of Ratnabar Island”, Nibedita Sen (Nightmare 5/19)
  • “A Catalog of Storms”, Fran Wilde (Uncanny 1-2/19)
  • “How the Trick Is Done”, A.C. Wise (Uncanny 7-8/19)

The Andre Norton Award for Outstanding Young Adult Science Fiction or Fantasy Book

  • Sal and Gabi Break the Universe, Carlos Hernandez (Disney Hyperion)
  • Catfishing on CatNet, Naomi Kritzer (Tor Teen)
  • Dragon Pearl, Yoon Ha Lee (Disney Hyperion)
  • Peasprout Chen: Battle of Champions, Henry Lien (Holt)
  • Cog, Greg van Eekhout (Harper)
  • Riverland, Fran Wilde (Amulet)

Game Writing

  • Outer Wilds, Kelsey Beachum (Mobius Digital)
  • The Outer Worlds, Leonard Boyarsky, Megan Starks, Kate Dollarhyde, Chris L’Etoile (Obsidian Entertainment)
  • The Magician’s Workshop, Kate Heartfield (Choice of Games)
  • Disco Elysium, Robert Kurvitz (ZA/UM)
  • Fate Accessibility Toolkit, Elsa Sjunneson-Henry (Evil Hat Productions)

The Ray Bradbury Award for Outstanding Dramatic Presentation

  • Avengers: Endgame, Christopher Markus & Stephen McFeely (Marvel Studios)
  • Captain Marvel, Anna Boden & Ryan Fleck & Geneva Robertson-Dworet (Marvel Studios)
  • Good Omens: “Hard Times”, Neil Gaiman (Amazon Studios/BBC Studios)
  • The Mandalorian: “The Child”, Jon Favreau (Disney+)
  • Russian Doll: “The Way Out”, Allison Silverman and Leslye Headland (Netflix)
  • Watchmen: “A God Walks into Abar”, Jeff Jensen & Damon Lindelof (HBO)

Hair Love by Matthew A. Cherry

Hair Love

Hair Love by Matthew A. Cherry
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

I read this partly because of it showing up on a black history month books list for children and partly because I wanted to see what the book was like after watching the short movie that won the Oscar. 

I enjoyed both the book and the movie, but the book was a little short to tell the whole story. The missing part makes the book more child- friendly, though. 

View all my reviews

diverse children’s books

Thirty day book challenge, day 23

Thirty day book challenge

A book quote you know by heart

I had a hard time with this one, because it seems that I’ve never read a lot of the books where I know the memorable lines. I discussed it trying to get ideas about which ones to include.

When I stepped out into the bright sunlight from the darkness of the movie house” The Outsiders. A book I have read multiple times. The movie almost does it justice.

“Alas, poor Yorick. I knew him” Hamlet. Read it multiple times.

“Call me Ishmael.” Moby Dick. Never read it.

Thirty day book challenge, day 18

Thirty day book challenge

A book you like by an author no longer living

To kill a mockingbird is one of the few books that I could think of that the author had died. It was very powerful and I had to put it down many times, but it was worth it.

Little women, too. I loved the story and it’s one of the few books that I enjoyed that I also enjoyed the movie. I refused to see the newest version in the theater, though. I just couldn’t understand how they could “modernize” a story that took place in wartime. I will wait until it hits TV. If I bother with it at all.

63/62

I met my reading goal for 2018. In fact, I exceeded it. I slowed down on the reading because of it. I shouldn’t, but I did.

Last night, I ended up going to sleep before 8 pm. My eyes were just too tired to read. Couldn’t focus on anything. So I just bundled up and slept. I will get back to it today.