Notable books of 2019

NY Times Notable books 2019

The New York Times put this list out of the best books of 2019. I have read several of them and have several on the TBR list. It’s a long list, but they are really good books.

The Age of Surveillance
Capitalism: The Fight
for a Human Future at
the New Frontier of Power

American SpyBy LAUREN WILKINSON

Antisocial: Online
Extremists, Techno-Utopians,
and the Hijacking of
American Conversation
By ANDREW MARANTZ

Audience of One: Donald
Trump, Television, and
the Fracturing of America
By JAMES PONIEWOZIK.

Bangkok Wakes to RainBy PITCHAYA SUDBANTHAD

BecomingBy MICHELLE OBAMA. 

The Beneficiary:
Fortune, Misfortune, and
the Story of My Father
By JANNY SCOTT

The Body in QuestionBy JILL CIMENT

Bottle of Lies: The Inside Story
of the Generic Drug Boom
By KATHERINE EBAN

The British Are Coming:
The War for America,
Lexington to Princeton, 1775-1777
By RICK ATKINSON. 

Cherokee, AmericaBy MARGARET VERBLE. 

The Club: Johnson,
Boswell, and the Friends
Who Shaped an Age
By LEO DAMROSCH. 

The Conservative SensibilityBy GEORGE F. WILL. 

The Crowded Hour:
Theodore Roosevelt, the
Rough Riders, and the Dawn
of the American Century
By CLAY RISEN. 

Deaf Republic: PoemsBy ILYA KAMINSKY. 

Disappearing EarthBy JULIA PHILLIPS.

Ducks, NewburyportBy LUCY ELLMANN. 

The Dutch HouseBy ANN PATCHETT

The Education of an
Idealist: A Memoir
By SAMANTHA POWER

Exhalation: StoriesBy TED CHIANG

Fall: Or, Dodge in HellBy NEAL STEPHENSON.

Fleishman Is in TroubleBy TAFFY BRODESSER-AKNER.

Full Throttle: StoriesBy JOE HILL

Furious Hours: Murder,
Fraud, and the Last
Trial of Harper Lee
By CASEY CEP

GirlBy EDNA O’BRIEN

The GodmotherBy HANNELORE CAYRE. Translated by
Stephanie Smee.

The Gone DeadBy CHANELLE BENZ

Good Talk: A Memoir
in Conversations
By MIRA JACOB

Grace Will Lead Us Home:
The Charleston Church
Massacre and the Hard,
Inspiring Journey to Forgiveness
By JENNIFER BERRY HAWES

The GrammariansBy CATHLEEN SCHINE

Grand Union: StoriesBy ZADIE SMITH. 

Growing Things:
And Other Stories
By PAUL TREMBLAY

The Guarded Gate: Bigotry,
Eugenics, and the Law That
Kept Two Generations of Jews,
Italians, and Other European
Immigrants Out of America
By DANIEL OKRENT. 

Guest House for
Young Widows: Among
the Women of ISIS
By AZADEH MOAVENI. 

The Heartbeat of Wounded
Knee: Native America
From 1890 to the Present
By DAVID TREUER. 

The HeavensBy SANDRA NEWMAN. 

HorizonBy BARRY LOPEZ

How to Be an AntiracistBy IBRAM X. KENDI

How We Fight For Our LivesBy SAEED JONES. 

If: The Untold Story of
Kipling’s American Years
By CHRISTOPHER BENFEY

The Impeachers: The Trial
of Andrew Johnson and
the Dream of a Just Nation
By BRENDA WINEAPPLE

In Byron’s Wake: The
Turbulent Lives of Lord Byron’s
Wife and Daughter: Annabella
Milbanke and Ada Lovelace
By MIRANDA SEYMOUR

In Hoffa’s Shadow: A
Stepfather, a Disappearance
in Detroit, and My
Search for the Truth
By JACK GOLDSMITH

The InstituteBy STEPHEN KING

Know My Name: A MemoirBy CHANEL MILLER

Kochland: The Secret History
of Koch Industries and
Corporate Power in America
By CHRISTOPHER LEONARD.

Last DayBy DOMENICA RUTA. 

The Last Whalers: Three
Years in the Far Pacific
With a Courageous Tribe
and a Vanishing Way of Life
By DOUG BOCK CLARK. 

The Lost Art of Scripture:
Rescuing the Sacred Texts
By KAREN ARMSTRONG. 

Lost Children ArchiveBy VALERIA LUISELLI. 

Lot: StoriesBy BRYAN WASHINGTON. 

Maid: Hard Work, Low Pay
and a Mother’s Will to Survive
By STEPHANIE LAND. 

Mama’s Last Hug: Animal
Emotions and What They
Tell Us About Ourselves
By FRANS DE WAAL. 

Maggie Brown & OthersBy PETER ORNER. 

The Man Who Saw EverythingBy DEBORAH LEVY. 

Margaret Thatcher:
The Authorized Biography
— Herself Alone
By CHARLES MOORE. 

The Mastermind: Drugs.
Empire. Murder. Betrayal.
By EVAN RATLIFF. 

The Memory PoliceBy YOKO OGAWA. Translated by
Stephen Snyder.

Midnight in Chernobyl: The
Untold Story of the World’s
Greatest Nuclear Disaster
By ADAM HIGGINBOTHAM.
Mostly Dead ThingsBy KRISTEN ARNETT. 

Mrs. EverythingBy JENNIFER WEINER.

The NeedBy HELEN PHILLIPS. 

The Nickel BoysBy COLSON WHITEHEAD. 

Night Boat to TangierBy KEVIN BARRY. 

No Visible Bruises: What
We Don’t Know About
Domestic Violence Can Kill Us
By RACHEL LOUISE SNYDER. 

Normal PeopleBy SALLY ROONEY. 

Nothing to See HereBy KEVIN WILSON. 

Now We Shall Be Entirely FreeBy ANDREW MILLER. 

The Octopus Museum: PoemsBy BRENDA SHAUGHNESSY. 

The Old DriftBy NAMWALI SERPELL. 

Optic NerveBy MARÍA GAINZA. Translated by
Thomas Bunstead.

Our Man: Richard
Holbrooke and the End
of the American Century
By GEORGE PACKER. 

The ParisianBy ISABELLA HAMMAD. 

The Problem With
Everything: My Journey
Through the New Culture Wars
By MEGHAN DAUM. 

Rabbits for FoodBy BINNIE KIRSHENBAUM. 

Red at the BoneBy JACQUELINE WOODSON. 

The RevisionersBy MARGARET WILKERSON
SEXTON.
 

Rusty BrownBy CHRIS WARE. 

Say Nothing: A True
Story of Murder and
Memory in Northern Ireland
By PATRICK RADDEN KEEFE. 

Separate: The Story of
Plessy v. Ferguson, and
America’s Journey From
Slavery to Segregation
By STEVE LUXENBERG. 

The Shadow KingBy MAAZA MENGISTE. 

She Said: Breaking the
Sexual Harassment Story That
Helped Ignite a Movement
By JODI KANTOR AND MEGAN
TWOHEY.
 

She Was Like That:
New and Selected Stories
By KATE WALBERT. 

Solitary: Unbroken by
Four Decades in Solitary
Confinement. My Story of
Transformation and Hope.
By ALBERT WOODFOX WITH
LESLIE GEORGE.
 

SpringBy ALI SMITH. 

Stony the Road:
Reconstruction, White
Supremacy, and the
Rise of Jim Crow
By HENRY LOUIS GATES
JR..
 

The TestamentsBy MARGARET ATWOOD.

Thick: And Other EssaysBy TRESSIE MCMILLAN
COTTOM.
 

The Topeka SchoolBy BEN LERNER. 

The TraditionBy JERICHO BROWN. 

Trick Mirror: Reflections
on Self-Delusion
By JIA TOLENTINO. 

Underland: A
Deep Time Journey
By ROBERT MACFARLANE. 

The Uninhabitable Earth:
Life After Warming
By DAVID WALLACE-WELLS. 

The Unwinding of the Miracle:
A Memoir of Life, Death, and
Everything That Comes After
By JULIE YIP-WILLIAMS. 

The War Before the War:
Fugitive Slaves and the Struggle
for America’s Soul From the
Revolution to the Civil War
By ANDREW DELBANCO. 

WestsideBy W.M. AKERS. 

What You Have Heard
Is True: A Memoir of
Witness and Resistance
By CAROLYN FORCHÉ. 

Women TalkingBy MIRIAM TOEWS. 

Women’s Work: A Reckoning
With Work and Home
By MEGAN K. STACK.

The Yellow HouseBy SARAH M. BROOM. 

The 30 Best Books to Read This Summer – 2019

The 30 Best Books to Read This Summer from List of lists

Here are some books that didn’t make it all the way to be posted last summer.  I haven’t heard of most of them, but maybe I’ll get to them someday.

The Paper Wasp by Lauren Acampora (June 11)

The Tenth Muse by Catherine Chung (June 18)

Hot Comb by Ebony Flowers (June 18)

The Dry Heart by Natalia Ginzburg (June 25)
Delayed Rays of a Star by Amanda Lee Koe (July 9)
Dapper Dan: Made in Harlem by Daniel R. Day (July 9)

What Do We Need Men For?: A Modest Proposal by E. Jean Carroll (July 16)

Coventry: Essays by Rachel Cusk (August 20)

Doxology by Nell Zink (August 27)

Best Books of 2019

Best books of 2019

In the above linked article, Tor.com’s regular book reviewers talk about notable titles they read in 2019. Here are a lot of the books that were mentioned.

Good Omens

The Quite Nice and Fairly Accurate Script Book

The Adventure Zone: Murder on the Rockport Limited 

Leigh Bardugo’s Ninth House 

 The Ten Thousand Doors of January by Alix E. Harrow

Gods of Jade and Shadow by Silvia Moreno-Garcia

The Migration Suite: A Study in C Sharp Minor

Cassandra Khaw’s “Mighty Are the Meek and the Myriad

And Now His Lordship Is Laughing” by Shiv Ramdas

A Memory Called Empire by Arkady Martine

Namwali Serpell’s The Old Drift

Sarah Pinsker’s A Song For a New Day 

 Sooner or Later Everything Falls Into the Sea, Pinsker

Rodrigo Márquez Tizano’s Jakarta (translated by Thomas Bunstead)

 Steel Tide by Natalie C. Parker

 Seafire 

Akwaeke Emezi’s Pet

In the world of Tehlor Kay Mejia’s We Set the Dark on Fire

Sandra Newman’s The Heavens 

 The Iron Dragon’s Mother by Michael Swanwick

Nina Allan’s The Dollmaker 

 The Best of R. A. Lafferty  his novel Past Master

Marlon James’s Black Leopard, Red Wolf,

Jeff VanderMeer’s Dead Astronauts

Christopher Priest’s Episodes 

The Future of Another Timeline by Annalee Newitz

To Be Taught, if Fortunate by Becky Chambers

 Magic for Liars by Sarah Gailey

The City in the Middle of the Night by Charlie Jane Anders

Hexarchate series by Yoon Ha Lee.Hexarchate Stories 

 The Library at Mount Char, 

 The Testaments by Margaret Atwood and

 Fall, or Dodge in Hell by Neal Stephenson

Empress of Forever by Max Gladstone.

Craft Sequence

Empress of Forever

 This Is How You Lose the Time War

Middlegame by Seanan McGuire

The Library at Mount Char

Sixteen Ways to Defend a Walled City by K.J. Parker.

Sharps

 Sixteen Ways to Defend a Walled City 

 Savages,  Sixteen Ways 

 The Night Circus 

 Tears of the Trufflepig

Becoming Superman, J. Michael Straczynski’s memoir,

Claire North’s The Gameshouse

Temi Oh’s Do You Dream of Terra-Two? 

Emily McGovern’s Bloodlust and Bonnets,

Joan Aiken’s The Serial Garden.

Amal El-Mohtar and Max Gladstone’s This Is How You Lose the Time War

Adrian Tchaikovsky’s Children of Ruin

 Children of Time.

 Gideon the Ninth 

Sarah Gailey’s Magic for Liars 

Arkady Martine’s A Memory Called Empire

Max Gladstone and Amal El-Mohtar’s This Is How You Lose the Time War

Carmen Maria Machado’s Her Body and Other Parties 

The Husband Stitch

“The Resident”

“Inventory”

The Hottest Books of Summer 2019

The Hottest Books of Summer has more books listed.  It was found on the List of lists.  

Here are the books discussed in the article, even though it’s late.  It’s a wonderful list.
FICTION

MYSTERY & THRILLER

FANTASY

NONFICTION

YOUNG ADULT

SCIENCE FICTION

ROMANCE

Thirty must read books of 2019

Thirty must read books of 2019

I read several of the books listed in the above linked article. I am still working on several of them. Some rolled over to the 2020 list, too.

1. Three Days Missing by Kimberly Belle

2. When the Lights Go Out by Mary Kubica

3. Lies by TM Logan

4. The Woman in the Window by AJ Finn

5. The Lost Girls of Camp Forevermore by Kim Fu

6. The Death of Mrs. Westaway by Ruth Ware

7. The Couple Next Door by Shari Lapena

8. Faithful by Alice Hoffman

9. Then She Was Gone by Lisa Jewell

10. The Clockmaker’s Daughter by Kate Morton

11. The Home for Unwanted Girls by Joanna Goodman

12. The Great Alone by Kristin Hannah

13. The Tattooist of Auschwitz by Heather Morris

14. A Spark of Light by Jodi Picoult

15. Nine Perfect Strangers by Liane Moriarty

16. She Lies in Wait by Gytha Lodge

17. Educated by Tara Westover

18. Children of Blood and Bone by Tomi Adeyemi

19. An American Marriage by Tayari Jones

20. The Wife Between Us by by Greer Hendricks and Sarah Pekkanen

21. The Chalk Man by C.J. Tudor

22. The Favorite Sister by Jessica Knoll

23. Circe by Madeline Miller

24. Five Feet Apart by Rachael Lippincott

25. The Alice Network by Kate Quinn

26. The Other Woman by Sandie Jones

27. Little Fires Everywhere by Celeste NgReport this ad

28. Where the Crawdads Sing by Delia Owens

29. Evicted by Matthew Desmond

30. The Witch’s Daughter by Paula Brackston

100 Most Notable Books of 2019

Notable books of 2019

The above linked article talks about the books that were published in 2019 that are the most notable. I’ve read a few, and I own a few. This is another great list.

The Age of Surveillance
Capitalism: The Fight
for a Human Future at
the New Frontier of Power
By SHOSHANA ZUBOFF

American SpyBy LAUREN WILKINSON

Antisocial: Online
Extremists, Techno-Utopians,
and the Hijacking of
American Conversation
By ANDREW MARANTZ

Audience of One: Donald
Trump, Television, and
the Fracturing of America
By JAMES PONIEWOZIK

Bangkok Wakes to RainBy PITCHAYA SUDBANTHAD

BecomingBy MICHELLE OBAMA

The Beneficiary:
Fortune, Misfortune, and
the Story of My Father
By JANNY SCOTT

The Body in QuestionBy JILL CIMENT

Bottle of Lies: The Inside Story
of the Generic Drug Boom
By KATHERINE EBAN

The British Are Coming:
The War for America,
Lexington to Princeton, 1775-1777
By RICK ATKINSON

Cherokee, AmericaBy MARGARET VERBLE

The Club: Johnson,
Boswell, and the Friends
Who Shaped an Age
By LEO DAMROSCH

The Conservative SensibilityBy GEORGE F. WILL

The Crowded Hour:
Theodore Roosevelt, the
Rough Riders, and the Dawn
of the American Century
By CLAY RISEN

Deaf Republic: PoemsBy ILYA KAMINSKY

Disappearing EarthBy JULIA PHILLIPS

Ducks, NewburyportBy LUCY ELLMANN

The Dutch HouseBy ANN PATCHETT

The Education of an
Idealist: A Memoir
By SAMANTHA POWER

Exhalation: StoriesBy TED CHIANG

Fall: Or, Dodge in HellBy NEAL STEPHENSON

Fleishman Is in TroubleBy TAFFY BRODESSER-AKNER

Full Throttle: StoriesBy JOE HILL

Furious Hours: Murder,
Fraud, and the Last
Trial of Harper Lee
By CASEY CEP

GirlBy EDNA O’BRIEN

The GodmotherBy HANNELORE CAYRE

The Gone DeadBy CHANELLE BENZ

Good Talk: A Memoir
in Conversations
By MIRA JACOB

Grace Will Lead Us Home:
The Charleston Church
Massacre and the Hard,
Inspiring Journey to Forgiveness
By JENNIFER BERRY HAWES

The GrammariansBy CATHLEEN SCHINE

Grand Union: StoriesBy ZADIE SMITH

Growing Things:
And Other Stories
By PAUL TREMBLAY

The Guarded Gate: Bigotry,
Eugenics, and the Law That
Kept Two Generations of Jews,
Italians, and Other European
Immigrants Out of America
By DANIEL OKRENT

Guest House for
Young Widows: Among
the Women of ISIS
By AZADEH MOAVENI

The Heartbeat of Wounded
Knee: Native America
From 1890 to the Present
By DAVID TREUER

The HeavensBy SANDRA NEWMAN

HorizonBy BARRY LOPEZ

How to Be an AntiracistBy IBRAM X. KENDI

How We Fight For Our LivesBy SAEED JONES

If: The Untold Story of
Kipling’s American Years
By CHRISTOPHER BENFEY

The Impeachers: The Trial
of Andrew Johnson and
the Dream of a Just Nation
By BRENDA WINEAPPLE

In Byron’s Wake: The
Turbulent Lives of Lord Byron’s
Wife and Daughter: Annabella
Milbanke and Ada Lovelace
By MIRANDA SEYMOUR

In Hoffa’s Shadow: A
Stepfather, a Disappearance
in Detroit, and My
Search for the Truth
By JACK GOLDSMITH

The InstituteBy STEPHEN KING

Know My Name: A MemoirBy CHANEL MILLER

Kochland: The Secret History
of Koch Industries and
Corporate Power in America
By CHRISTOPHER LEONARD

Last DayBy DOMENICA RUTA

The Last Whalers: Three
Years in the Far Pacific
With a Courageous Tribe
and a Vanishing Way of Life
By DOUG BOCK CLARK

The Lost Art of Scripture:
Rescuing the Sacred Texts
By KAREN ARMSTRONG

Lost Children ArchiveBy VALERIA LUISELLI

Lot: StoriesBy BRYAN WASHINGTON

Maid: Hard Work, Low Pay
and a Mother’s Will to Survive
By STEPHANIE LAND

Mama’s Last Hug: Animal
Emotions and What They
Tell Us About Ourselves
By FRANS DE WAAL

Maggie Brown & OthersBy PETER ORNER

The Man Who Saw EverythingBy DEBORAH LEVY

Margaret Thatcher:
The Authorized Biography
— Herself Alone
By CHARLES MOORE

The Mastermind: Drugs.
Empire. Murder. Betrayal.
By EVAN RATLIFF

The Memory PoliceBy YOKO OGAWA

Midnight in Chernobyl: The
Untold Story of the World’s
Greatest Nuclear Disaster
By ADAM HIGGINBOTHAM.

Mostly Dead ThingsBy KRISTEN ARNETT

Mrs. EverythingBy JENNIFER WEINER

The NeedBy HELEN PHILLIPS

The Nickel BoysBy COLSON WHITEHEAD

Night Boat to TangierBy KEVIN BARRY

No Visible Bruises: What
We Don’t Know About
Domestic Violence Can Kill Us
By RACHEL LOUISE SNYDER

Normal PeopleBy SALLY ROONEY

Nothing to See HereBy KEVIN WILSON

Now We Shall Be Entirely FreeBy ANDREW MILLER

The Octopus Museum: PoemsBy BRENDA SHAUGHNESSY

The Old DriftBy NAMWALI SERPELL

Optic NerveBy MARÍA GAINZA

Our Man: Richard
Holbrooke and the End
of the American Century
By GEORGE PACKER

The ParisianBy ISABELLA HAMMAD

The Problem With
Everything: My Journey
Through the New Culture Wars
By MEGHAN DAUM

Rabbits for FoodBy BINNIE KIRSHENBAUM

Red at the BoneBy JACQUELINE WOODSON

The RevisionersBy MARGARET WILKERSON
SEXTON

Rusty BrownBy CHRIS WARE

Say Nothing: A True
Story of Murder and
Memory in Northern Ireland
By PATRICK RADDEN KEEFE

Separate: The Story of
Plessy v. Ferguson, and
America’s Journey From
Slavery to Segregation
By STEVE LUXENBERG

The Shadow KingBy MAAZA MENGISTE

She Said: Breaking the
Sexual Harassment Story That
Helped Ignite a Movement
By JODI KANTOR AND MEGAN
TWOHEY

She Was Like That:
New and Selected Stories
By KATE WALBERT

Solitary: Unbroken by
Four Decades in Solitary
Confinement. My Story of
Transformation and Hope.
By ALBERT WOODFOX WITH
LESLIE GEORGE

SpringBy ALI SMITH

Stony the Road:
Reconstruction, White
Supremacy, and the
Rise of Jim Crow
By HENRY LOUIS GATES
JR.

The TestamentsBy MARGARET ATWOOD

Thick: And Other EssaysBy TRESSIE MCMILLAN
COTTOM

The Topeka SchoolBy BEN LERNER

The TraditionBy JERICHO BROWN

Trick Mirror: Reflections
on Self-Delusion
By JIA TOLENTINO

Underland: A
Deep Time Journey
By ROBERT MACFARLANE

The Uninhabitable Earth:
Life After Warming
By DAVID WALLACE-WELLS

The Unwinding of the Miracle:
A Memoir of Life, Death, and
Everything That Comes After
By JULIE YIP-WILLIAMS

The War Before the War:
Fugitive Slaves and the Struggle
for America’s Soul From the
Revolution to the Civil War
By ANDREW DELBANCO

WestsideBy W.M. AKERS

What You Have Heard
Is True: A Memoir of
Witness and Resistance
By CAROLYN FORCHÉ

Women TalkingBy MIRIAM TOEWS

Women’s Work: A Reckoning
With Work and Home
By MEGAN K. STACK

The Yellow HouseBy SARAH M. BROOM.

New podcast

When I don’t have an audiobook going in the car, I’ll go for a podcast. I had a new one fall into my lap last week. Its host is a woman who lost 100 pounds twelve years ago, making small changes.

Her main advice is to not start anything that you aren’t prepared to keep up for your entire life. And next is to not do anything big that is a quick fix.

My first week, I was away, so I wasn’t fully ready to start anything. I decided to go for 64 ounces of water a day. I actually managed it and more. I got through the running to the bathroom to pee all day while I was on vacation and it didn’t really matter if I wandered off. I kept it up. I am no longer running off as frequently, since my body seems to have adjusted.

Sunday night, I packed all my stuff for an early morning swim, followed by work. I got my lunch ready to bring with me.

I weighed myself this morning. I will be continuing that on Mondays.

Today, I got up early. I put on my swimsuit and cover-up, grabbed my bag and headed to the gym. I got in the pool and told myself to not do the full distance. When I got halfway through, I told myself to just do a little more. Then, suddenly, I had just one lap to go! I did it! I went into the hot tub after the swim. I had to get out when the guy in his tidy whities got in. Nope. Didn’t want to see that getting out of the water.

I showered, dressed, and went to work, drinking my water along the way. I found that they moved the little free library a block away! I chose a healthier breakfast than I normally would. I got my coffee and settled into a work schedule.

Close to lunch time, I realized I left my lunch at home in the fridge. Thankfully, we were off early and I wouldn’t starve on the way home.

I went to drop some of the books from my car into the little free library, went to the post office and ATM. I picked up a hold from the library and went home to eat my lunch. I napped and then went to the grocery store.

When I got home, I took out the garbage cans. I had forgotten that I was going to take a kid to get snacks at the grocery store, so I sent them back to the store with my debit card.

I got my stuff ready for a trip to the pool again tomorrow. Is this something I can keep up for the rest of my life? I sure hope so.

George, by Alex Gino

LGBTQ list for kids – Pride month

I picked this one up from the library

George

George by Alex Gino
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

This is a very well written story about George trying to tell people that she’s a girl. George is surprised by who supports her and who needs a little more time to understand.

The book showed up on the LGBT books for kids list, but it’s more of a YA book. It was enjoyable either way.

View all my reviews

Daisy Jones and the Six, by Taylor Jenkins Reid

Daisy Jones & The Six

I didn’t realize that this was written by the same author as The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo.  I loved that book, too.

Daisy Jones & The Six by Taylor Jenkins Reid
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

I really enjoyed this book! It has become a running joke with my family and friends because I carried it around with me for months. I never disliked it, it was just that the world seemed hell bent on not letting me finish it.

The book was written like a Rolling Stones article. Each person involved got his say. It was a different approach to telling the story, but it worked. I loved it.